Are You Missing Opportunities on Twitter Because of Your Profile Bio?

Make sure your Twitter profile encourages people to follow you.

Make sure your Twitter profile encourages people to follow you.

When someone follows me on Twitter, the first thing I do is click through to that person’s Twitter bio from the email notification I get.  (I do NOT do automatic follow because I want to check out who is following me.)

And what do I often find?  I can’t read the person’s 160-character bio, let alone the person’s name, because the sidebar of that profile is so dark that the text gets swallowed up by the sidebar.

Now, really, if the purpose of the bio is to tell people what you are about, why would you choose a sidebar color that makes the text unreadable?

As I wrote about on this site in a previous post about making it easy for people to read your blog posts, you should make it easy for people to read your Twitter profile as well as your website copy and anything else that you put on the Internet.

Now once you’ve made sure your profile sidebar is a light enough color so that the bio text can be easily read, check out what you’re written in the bio:

1)    Have you used keywords that people might be searching for?

2)    Have you given information that will encourage people interested in what you tweet about to follow you?

You probably know the kind of Twitter bio that only says something such as: Glad to be here.  Or this one: I tweet about what I like.  That’s very nice.  But why should I follow you?

The maximum character limit of 160 for the bio may not be huge, but it is certainly large enough to provide information that can encourage me to follow you.

While there are numerous Twitter products being sold to help you increase your followers, it makes sense to first make sure that you have an effective Twitter profile.

If you want more recommendations for an effective Twitter profile, I’ve written four blog posts at www.TwitterandYourWebsite.com about different elements of the profile.  You can get the links to all four of these posts at http://budurl.com/TWgoals

(c) 2009 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is an Internet business consultant.  If you liked this article, you’ll love her free report on “How to Become a Twitter Marketing Expert” – claim your report now from www.millermosaicllc.com/free-twitter-report

  6 comments for “Are You Missing Opportunities on Twitter Because of Your Profile Bio?

  1. December 15, 2009 at 3:25 am

    This is a good tip I didn’t consider Phyllis. I tried something else with our Twitter account Bio using our most popular keywords — Blog, Blogger, Blogging, SEO, Twitter, Social Media. http://twitter.com/BloggerBulletin. I’m still thinking about it.

  2. December 15, 2009 at 8:08 am

    Below is the current Twitter bio for @BloggerBulletin:

    Here are my comments:

    All capital letters are harder to read and daily publication sounds as if it is hard copy. And I don’t like the exclamation point. Plus what’s in it for me the reader?

    A Daily Publication for Bloggers, with 60 Contributors Covering Topics Including Social Media, Twitter, Facebook, SEO, Blogging Software, and Blog Writing!

    Here’s another version — and by using the word bloggers I get that this is online plus the 60 is brought to the fore as it is the best benefit — so many different viewpoints:

    60 blogger rotation daily provides advice on social media, Twitter, Facebook, SEO, blogging software, and blog writing.

    Phyllis
    http://twitter.com/ZimblerMiller

  3. December 15, 2009 at 12:22 pm

    I’ll change it to your version, Phyllis :-)

  4. December 15, 2009 at 4:07 pm

    Totally agree Phyllis.

    I follow the same procedure as you when y follow someone who is following me (don’t auto follow) Why should I follow you? Key point question if you want to have a trustable and meaningful tribe.

    Thanks for sharing

  5. Nils Montan
    December 17, 2009 at 2:25 am

    Wow, great comment Phyllis, thanks so much. It is amazing how much these little things can matter and most of us don’t have a clue.

  6. December 17, 2009 at 7:57 am

    Nils —

    I always tell my clients that these little things do matter. Thanks for your response!

    And, Israel, thanks for your comment too!

    Phyllis

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